All posts tagged: Beth Everest

Book Review of “Any Bright Horse” by Lisa Pasold

Beth Everest A review of Any Bright Horse by Lisa Pasold Frontenac House Poetry ISBN: 978-1-897181-55-3 $15.95 What intrigues me most about Lisa Pasold’s poetic narrative is the perspective. The book contains six sections, alternating focus between Marco Polo’s journeys and those of a contemporary dancer. But this is what happens: after we are introduced to Marco Polo and his stories, the contemporary narrator wonders “what if my neighbor believes he is Marco Polo” (33). Once suggested, their stories overlap. As Polo’s stories are recorded by Rusticello and given to the world in many versions, so the dancer’s stories are told by her neighbor in the second person perspective and thereby involve not only the dancer but the reader as imaginary participants. Of course, all of this is filtered through Pasold’s imagination and scribed by her. Any Bright Horse is also a narrative about narrative, and while this trope has been done many times before, Pasold’s strength is in her words. Her narrator asks, “what if I tell him every story I know…/ what will …

Book Review of “Yes” by Rosemary Griebel

“Yes” has been shortlisted for the Stephan G. Stephansson Award for poetry, The Gerald Lampert Memorial Award and the Pat Lowther Memorial Award, congratulations Rosemary. Beth Everest A Review of Yes. by Rosemary Griebel Frontenac House ISBN 9781897181492 $16.00 I have been looking forward to reading this collection because of Rosemary Griebel’s recent successes, not least of which have been three winning contest pieces in FreeFall in two years. I anticipated being encouraged, if not motivated by a book titled Yes. I was not disappointed, but the book was hardly what I expected. Yes opens with “My Father Comes Back,” and I was ready for the father to be a central focus. Not so. Instead, it’s the final line of this poem that sets up the ghosts that are to appear in the following pages: his large white eyes /turned on a darkening world, cavernous nostrils/releasing ghosts into winter air.” The world appears mostly dark, and the people in it struggle with its language in many forms. The ghosts appear as such characters as the …